Working Class Heroes

Contact

c/o CLIC • SERTUC
Submit your nominations and for more information please contact us.
info@workingclassheroes.org.uk
tel: 07950 197422

Working Class Heroes

“Working Class Heroes” is being developed in collaboration with SERTUC's (South East Region Trades Union Council) “Cultural and Leisure Industries Committee” so as the integrity of the subject matter is not compromised and the event's organisation is assured.

Artists

All participating artists will be members of a Trade Union. The project will be carried out through a ‘management’ group of professional curators, TU representatives, sponsors representatives and artists.

Artists News • latest

Dax Kelly has completed the first section of his work about the influential Trade Union Leader Jack Jones. Kelly’s work consists of several components specifically located where Jack Jones had been politically active during his life. The final section of the work will be completed for installation on April 1 (2019) to coincide with the 80th anniversary of the official ending of The Spanish Civil War.

Annie Morrad has unearthed some extraordinary information about Mary Seacole which will be incorporated into her installation. Morrad is also planning to produce a sound work linking the many exotic places where Seacole had practiced her nursing.

Jenni Boswell-Jones connects regions and continents to celebrate the life and achievements of Thomas Paine. She is working collaboratively with archivists in US Capitol and The Wearmouth Bridge Trust in Sunderland where she is aiming to locate the final work.

May Ayres has shifted her satirical style and highly critical work lampooning powerful men and women to raise awareness of Bruce Kent’s long history of championing CND. She is currently in negotiations with the Catholic Archibishop’s office to locate the work in Westminster Cathedral.

Glynne Williams - who hales from Shrewsbury - is fittingly working on a sculpture of Ricky Tomlinson. The stone carving will be located on the roof of the prison where Tomlinson and the “24” were confined.

Alison Marchant excavates the significance of Germain Greer’s “Female Eunoch”. The work aims to challenge the regressive anti-feminist ‘thatcherist’ policies that have been set in stone since the book was first published in 1970.